Time in Ancient Greek Literature

Time in Ancient Greek Literature

Language: English

Pages: 557

ISBN: 2:00318802

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


This is the second volume of a new narratological history of Ancient Greek lietrature, which deals with aspects of time: the order in which events are narrated, the amount of time devoted to the naration, and the number of times they are presented.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Klooster part two. historiography Chapter Seven. Herodotus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 T. Rood Chapter Eight. Thucydides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 T. Rood Chapter Nine. Xenophon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 T. Rood vi table of contents Chapter Ten. Polybius . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

instance, the punishment and revenge of Euenius, the ‘negligent nightwatchman’, introduced as the father of a character mentioned in the narrative (9.93–95).21 Often the placing of these apparently incidental analepses or prolepses seems telling. We have already seen that Herodotus closes his work with an anecdote concerning an ancestor of the Persian Artayctes, who has just been crucified by the Athenians (9.122). Many critics have noted how this anecdote provides a closure (though not a

crops) vague and often explanatory (the state of the corn or wine harvest can affect behaviour). The variations in speed that are easiest to discern are variations between different seasons and years.11 Analysis shows that winters tend to be narrated more quickly than summers and that the years of C. Macleod 1983: 136 n. 5. Cf. the chart of war-years at Luschnat 1971: 1117–1118 (measured by Teubner pages): the shortest year is 2.5 pages, the longest 59.5; the average page-length for years 1–10 is

prior events in Asia and Egypt: they are said to have been covered by many historians already, and ‘in our own times Fortune has wrought no such surprising change in these countries as to render any notice of their past necessary’ (2.37.6). Again Polybius’ Achaean interests are evident. The summary form of books 1–2 is shown when nine years of the Carthaginian war in Spain are described in sixteen lines (2.1.5–9) or when the successes of the Spartan king Cleomenes are listed (2.51.1– 2). But that

after the departure of Ariarathes from Italy until his restoration to power in Cappadocia, and then reverted to events in Greece, ‘partly recurring to the past and partly anticipating the future, so that, the separate details of it being by no means striking, I may not by relating them under different dates, produce a narrative both obscure and insignificant’ (32.11.1–6). Here Polybius has departed both from the normal ordering of events within the year (affairs in Greece were normally described

Download sample

Download