The Yosemite Murders

The Yosemite Murders

Dennis McDougal

Language: English

Pages: 325

ISBN: 0739408356

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arizona man who had died the previous July at nearby Bass Lake. A search of his van yielded a bloodstained piece of carpet. Becky's Chevrolet Citation was also impounded. It was returned within a few days, after agents had vacuumed it and removed some of its contents. Her voice breaking and barely under control, Becky Buttermore defended Billy Joe when the police came for him. Wearing large-lens horn-rimmed glasses and a ponytail, she was normally effusive and as well liked in the community as

developmentally disabled adults. When most of Carole's Eureka neighbors opposed the opening of a methadone clinic in town, she supported it. “Those people need help too,” she said. Ironically, Carole and Juli had both been enrolled in self-defense courses, and Carole got a canister of pepper spray as a gift at Christmas. Despite her nearly maniacal obsession with being prepared for crime or catastrophe, Carole took neither the pepper spray nor her cell phone with her on the Yosemite trip. She

mutual. Following the benediction by the Reverend Paul Bodin of Emmanuel Lutheran Church, her stiff upper lip finally began to soften, as she and her husband made preparations to shut down their Holiday Inn command center and return for good to their retirement retreat in Butler Valley, near Eureka, and their three remaining grandchildren. “I guess it's time to cry,” she said. “I really can't say much. It's difficult. But I am glad we came.” VII In Fresno, a Grand Jury began formally

later, the farm laborer pleaded no contest and Merced Superior Court Judge George C. Barrett gave him ninety days in jail, a $100 fine, and suspension of his driver's license for a year. Already angry over the court's refusal to give Loera the maximum sentence of four years, Stay-ner's estranged wife hired San Francisco's celebrated “King of Torts,” lawyer Melvin Belli, and sued Merced County for $5 million, claiming that the stretch of highway where Stayner died was unsafe, and unmarked as a

road. Because dogs were unable to pick up her scent beyond the road's edge, it was widely assumed she had climbed into someone's car and been whisked away. On the day Stayner was charged with Joie Ruth Armstrong's murder, Beverly and her husband Art Smith—devout Mennonites—celebrated their twentysixth wedding anniversary. What good feeling they may have salvaged from that celebration evaporated when they heard it reported that Cary had been dreaming of killing women for thirty years. Beverly

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