The Kingdom of Fungi

The Kingdom of Fungi

Jens H. Petersen

Language: English

Pages: 272

ISBN: 0691157545

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The fungi realm has been called the "hidden kingdom," a mysterious world populated by microscopic spores, gigantic mushrooms and toadstools, and a host of other multicellular organisms ranging widely in color, size, and shape. The Kingdom of Fungi provides an intimate look at the world's astonishing variety of fungi species, from cup fungi and lichens to truffles and tooth fungi, clubs and corals, and jelly fungi and puffballs. This beautifully illustrated book features more than 800 stunning color photographs as well as a concise text that describes the biology and ecology of fungi, fungal morphology, where fungi grow, and human interactions with and uses of fungi.

The Kingdom of Fungi is a feast for the senses, and the ideal reference for naturalists, researchers, and anyone interested in fungi.

  • Reveals fungal life as never seen before
  • Features more than 800 stunning color photos
  • Describes fungal biology, morphology, distribution, and uses
  • A must-have reference book for naturalists and researchers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

touching the stem) or attached. Attached gills may be attached very narrowly (adnexed) or broadly (adnate), or they may be more or less decurrent. An intermediate type is the emarginate gills, which first bend toward the cap but then turn and go slightly down the stem. Pluteus romellii with free gills, Denmark (× 10) Parasola plicatilis with free gills, Denmark (× 10) Marasmius berteroi with almost free gills, Ecuador (× 10) Entoloma serrulatum with adnexed gills, Denmark (× 10) Mycena

for this variation are obvious: spores dispersed in water often have appendices to enable them to float better, while spores destined to germinate on dung are often thick-walled so they can pass through animals’ digestive tracts unharmed. But for most spore variation, we have no good explanation—spores just vary beautifully. Ciboria betulae releasing spores, Denmark (× 15) Leucocoprinus cretaceus releasing spores, Borneo (TL) 8 fungal SPoreS Fungal spore variation (AH) 9 fungal SPoreS

Cup fungi The cup fungi (or discomycetes) are characterized by open fruiting bodies, also called apothecia. The hymenium (the area containing the asci) is exposed and the asci can shoot their spores freely into the air. In the close-ups of fruiting bodies on this page you can see the asci protruding from the hymenium. In the lower two, you can even see the spores within the asci. Cup fungi are not necessarily disk- or cup-shaped. In many cases they can be club-shaped, spatulate, or even have a

g I Most inoperculate cup fungi form disk- or cup-shaped fruiting bodies similar to those of the operculate fungi: the inner surface contains the hymenium and the outer surface is sterile. The sterile side may be smooth or covered with hairs. Orbilia delicatula, Denmark (× 8) Bisporella citrina, Denmark (× 6) Mollisia cinerea, Denmark (× 8) Ascocoryne sarcoides, Denmark (× 3) Chlorociboria aeruginascens, Denmark (× 3) Crocicreas coronatum, Denmark (× 6) 62 t H e a S c o m y c o ta — I

debris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wood-decaying fungi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fungi on dung . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Decaying fungi in other strange places . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mycorrhizal fungi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lichenized fungi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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