The Christian Archetype: A Jungian Commentary on the Life of Christ (Studies in Jungian Psychology by Jungian Analysts)

The Christian Archetype: A Jungian Commentary on the Life of Christ (Studies in Jungian Psychology by Jungian Analysts)

Edward F. Edinger

Language: English

Pages: 143

ISBN: 0919123279

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


This book presents a much-need psychological interpretation of images and events central to the Christian myth, which may be understood symbolically in terms of the individuation of modern men and women.

The process of individuation, when it befalls a person, may lead to salvation or calamity. The reader will find here an ordered and graphic amplification of this archetypal process.

In prose and in pictures carefully selected from traditional Christian art, the author illustrates some essential stages-from Annunciation through Crucifixion to Resurrection-both in the life of Christ and in those who by choice or fate become immersed in their own psychological destiny.

CONTENTS: Annunciation * Nativity * Flight into Egypt * Baptism * Triumphal Entry into Jerusalem * Last Supper * Gethsemane * Arrest and Trial * Flagellation and Mocking * Crucifixion * Lamentation and Entombment * Resurrection and Ascension * Pentecost * Assumption and Coronation of Mary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

transpersonal psyche as consciously manifested in the individualthe essential feature of individuation. Trial Before Pilate THEN PILATE ENTERED INTO THE JUDGMENT HALL AGAIN, AND CALLED JESUS, AND SAID UNTO HIM, ART THOU THE KING OF THE JEWS? . . .JESUS ANSWERED, MY KINGDOM IS NOT OF THIS WORLD: IF MY KINGDOM WERE OF THIS WORLD, THEN WOULD MY SERVANTS FIGHT, THAT I SHOULD NOT BE DELIVERED TO THE JEWS: BUT NOW IS MY KINGDOM NOT FROM HENCE. PILATE THEREFORE SAID UNTO HIM, ART THOU A KING THEN? JESUS

under Byzantine influence, represented Christ himself alive and open-eyed, a triumphant Savior wearing a royal crown. In the 1lth Century there appeared a new type, the emaciated figure with its head fallen on one shoulder and, later, wearing the crown of thorns. This version prevailed in western art thereafter.2 Collective consciousness has thus altered its relation to this image through the centuries. Initially it is expressed in an archetypal, impersonal way with no indication of human

destined upwards, the other downwards, and so likewise the shadow is on one side regrettable and reprehensible weakness, on the other side healthy instinctivity and the prerequisite for higher consciousness.4 Other pairs of opposites that gather around the cross include the lance-bearer and the sponge-bearer and even the sun and the moon. The crucifixion is clearly a coniunctio and thus manifests the phenomenology of that symbolism.5 In ecclesiastical art there has been a definite tendency to

myth begins and ends with the same imagethe descent of the Holy Ghost. This suggests that the sequence may express a circular process which might be arranged as follows: The Incarnation Cycle Pentecost is a second Annunciation. Just as the first Annunciation is followed by the birth of Christ, so the second Annunciation is followed by the birth of the Church.3 The Church as the body of Christ is then destined to live out collectively the same sequence of images as did Christ. According to Hugo

people fasted, men did not sleep with their wives, and no fires were lighted in Cuzco, the capitol. The sacred new fire was obtained direct from the sun by concentrating his beams on a highly polished concave plate and reflecting them on a little cotton wool. . . . Portions of the new fire were . . . conveyed to the temple of the sun and to the convent of the sacred virgins, where they were kept burning all the year and it was an ill omen if the holy flame went out.14 The Apostle Paul says, There

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