The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Darwin and Evolutionary Thought

The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Darwin and Evolutionary Thought

Language: English

Pages: 583

ISBN: 0521195314

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


This volume is a comprehensive reference work on the life, labors, and influence of the great evolutionist Charles Darwin. With more than sixty essays written by an international group representing the leading scholars in the field, this is the definitive work on Darwin. It covers the background to Darwin's discovery of the theory of evolution through natural selection, the work he produced and his contemporaries' reactions to it, and evaluates his influence on science in the 150 years since the publication of Origin of Species. It also explores the implications of Darwin's discoveries in religion, politics, gender, literature, culture, philosophy, and medicine, critically evaluating Darwin's legacy. Fully illustrated and clearly written, it is suitable for scholars and students as well as the general reader. The wealth of information it provides about the history of evolutionary thought makes it a crucial resource for understanding the controversies that surround evolution today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Darwin and the Levels of Selection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 Daniel Deen, Brian Hollis, and Chris Zarpentine 10 Sexual Selection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Richard A. Richards 25 Darwin and Religion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 Mark Pallen and Alison Pearn 11 Darwin and Species. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 James Mallet 26 Darwinism in Britain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

reproduction brought on by the struggle for existence. It is nice G  11  g Introduction to be able to report that Darwin was very appreciative of this work, even to the extent of finding the major player (Henry Walter Bates) a good job (albeit one that rather took him away from his science). What is rather puzzling is that, although the work found its way into later editions of the Origin, Darwin never moved it quite as much up front and center as one might have expected. This possibly could

life is just how nonemotionally involved he was in religion. He had to think about it quite a bit, both as he was growing up and then when he had his theory, one that so clearly did impinge on religious belief – but he never seems to agonize over it, nor is it an obsession. In this he contrasts strongly not only with his Cambridge teachers, clergymen down the line, but also with his friends. Lyell, who worshiped with the Unitarians for a while, obsessed about the status of humankind. Huxley, who

his ­marriage to his first cousin Emma Wedgwood. Permission: English Heritage The Cambridge Encyclopedia of D a rw i n a n d E vo lu t i o na ry T h o u g h t Gg Edited by Michael Ruse Florida State University cambridge university press Cambridge, New York, Melbourne, Madrid, Cape Town, Singapore, São Paulo, Delhi, Mexico City Cambridge University Press 32 Avenue of the Americas, New York, ny 10013–2473, usa www.cambridge.org Information on this title: www.cambridge.org/9780521195317 ©

ditches, forests, and the like  – and Kettlewell continued the studies of industrial melanism that had so excited nineteenth-century lepidopterists. No less adept than Dobzhansky at finding funds, Ford convinced one of Britain’s largest private research foundations  – the Nuffield Foundation, started by England’s counterpart to the real Henry Ford of Detroit – that insects are great models for humans. For instance, the studies of his group could tell much about the spread and retentions of

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