Don't Get Taken Every Time : The Ultimate Guide to Buying or Leasing a Car in the Showroom or on the Internet

Don't Get Taken Every Time : The Ultimate Guide to Buying or Leasing a Car in the Showroom or on the Internet

Remar Sutton

Language: English

Pages: 432

ISBN: 0141001496

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


For fifteen years, automotive consumer expert and former auto dealer Remar Sutton has helped hundreds of thousands of car buyers to get the best deal in town. This completely new edition protects car buyers from the dealers' latest secret weapon-the Internet. Even the smallest bit of information entered on a Web site can give dealers what they need to take unfair advantage of their customers. From shopping and negotiating to financing, Sutton exposes car dealers' scams and gives you step-by-step instructions on how to get the best deal. With vital information about Internet shopping, privacy issues and how to use the Internet safely, and taking on the dealers, Sutton's guide is a must-read before stepping into a real or virtual showroom.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

pocket. Dealers are very jealous of both this end-of-the-year “holdback” and their normal holdback, and they seldom share this profit with their salesmen, much less their customers—though they love to ballyhoo “end-of-the-year” savings and “secret holdback sales” in their promotions. They ballyhoo, but of course don’t give them to you. If you are aware of the largess, however, you will be in a stronger position to negotiate your deal. “Is it a good idea to wait until year-end to buy a car in the

your Available Cash and your needs. For instance, do you want an SUV or a convertible? If you want an SUV, do you want a cheap one or a fancy one? After deciding on the type of vehicle you want, go to the manufacturers’ sites to gather general information on these vehicles. For comparison purposes, go to more than one manufacturer. Remember that these sites give you only the good news, not the news you really need. Enter the manufacturer’s name (like GM) or the make of vehicle (like Chevrolet)

low price, on the one car you’ve shown interest in. You would be surprised how many people come back in, too, and then let the same salesman raise them another $2,000 for the same car. Be honest when someone asks you this question, but couch your honesty in self-protective terms if you are dead set on buying a car, a specific car, that day. Try something like this: “Yes, I may buy a car today. But I am going to buy it from the dealership that lets me determine how we negotiate.” One of the most

salesperson’s best friend. After a day’s shopping at several different dealerships, most folks hardly remember their own names, much less understand the offers and counteroffers whisked before them. Sales staffs use confusion to keep you from buying a car at another dealership. They imply that enormous savings are waiting for you on your return. They tell you about the customer who has been waiting for a trade-in just like yours, hoping you’ll fall for that classic line. Confusion is also used

dealership pulls.7 By federal law, you now have the right to get one free credit report annually from each of the big three credit bureaus: Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion. You may order your free reports online at the official Web site (www.annualcreditreport.com) or make your request by toll-free phone call to 877-322-8228. These are the only ways to get the official free reports. Other online offers are either commercial or scams—and there are lots of scams. This consumer-oriented credit

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