Ancient Greek Cults: A Guide

Ancient Greek Cults: A Guide

Jennifer Larson

Language: English

Pages: 320

ISBN: 0415491029

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Using archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources; and incorporating current scholarly theories, this volume will serve as an excellent companion to any introduction to Greek mythology, showing a side of the Greek gods to which most students are rarely exposed.

Detailed enough to be used as a quick reference tool or text, and providing a readable account focusing on the oldest, most widespread, and most interesting religious practices of the ancient Greek world in the Archaic and Classical periods, Ancient Greek Cults surveys ancient Greek religion through the cults of its gods and goddesses, heroes and heroines.

Jennifer Larson conveniently summarizes a vast amount of material in many languages, normally inaccessible to undergrad students, and explores, in detail, the variety of cults celebrated by the Greeks, how these cults differed geographically, and how each deity was conceptualized in local cult titles and rituals.

Including an introductory chapter on sources and methods, and suggestions for further reading this book will allow readers to gain a fresh perspective on Greek religion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Murray. Uhlenbrock, Jaimee Pugliese. 1986. Herakles: Passage of the hero through 1000 years of classical art. New Rochelle NY and Annandale-on-Hudson NY: Aristide D. Caratzas; Edith C. Blum Art Institute. Valmin, Mattias Natan. 1938. The Swedish Messenia expedition. Lund: C. W. K. Gleerup. van Berchem, D., ed. 1975. Chypre des origines au moyen-âge: séminaire interdisciplinaire, semestre d’été, 1975. Geneva: University of Geneva, Département des sciences de l’antiquité. van Compernolle, R.

137, 140–1; and Dirke 200; and Hera 29; and Herakles 184; and Hermes 148; and Kabiroi 172–3, 174; and Kadmos 98, 119, 156; and Oedipus 202–3; and Semele 141, 188; Seven Against 20, 156, 204 Thelpousa (Arkadia) 66, 80 Themistokles 171, 184; personal name 184 theoxenia 138, 190; see also hospitality Thera 23, 53, 202 Therapne 190–1, 198 theriomorphism 22, 79–81 passim; 150, 152, 153 Thermon 86, 89–90, 90 fig. 7.3, 102 Thermopylai 90 Theseion (Athens) 207 Thessaly 78, 104, 201;

137, 140–1; and Dirke 200; and Hera 29; and Herakles 184; and Hermes 148; and Kabiroi 172–3, 174; and Kadmos 98, 119, 156; and Oedipus 202–3; and Semele 141, 188; Seven Against 20, 156, 204 Thelpousa (Arkadia) 66, 80 Themistokles 171, 184; personal name 184 theoxenia 138, 190; see also hospitality Thera 23, 53, 202 Therapne 190–1, 198 theriomorphism 22, 79–81 passim; 150, 152, 153 Thermon 86, 89–90, 90 fig. 7.3, 102 Thermopylai 90 Theseion (Athens) 207 Thessaly 78, 104, 201;

example Poseidon’s regular relations with Demeter, Apollo’s with Artemis, and Zeus’ with Athena. Also, each chapter on the major deities includes discussion of selected minor figures whose cults are closely associated. Throughout the book, I stress geographic and ethnic distinctiveness. The importance of ethnicity, already noted by Farnell as a crucial variable in Greek religious practice, has recently received new emphasis as scholars investigate the “cultures within Greek culture.” In

god Enyalios. In thanks for their victory at Marathon in 490, the Athenians annually organized a large procession to Agrai outside the city, a pleasant spot where the young Artemis was supposed to have hunted for the first time. Dressed in their armor, the ephebes escorted five hundred female goats to be sacrificed at Artemis’ small Classical temple on the Ilissos river. The battles of Artemision and Salamis were also commemorated with festivals for Artemis, whose saving power was felt in times

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